Summer Winos»Uncategorized»Getting Sam Home Again

Getting Sam Home Again

After falling in love with the feature-length 1983 Last of the Summer Wine special, Getting Sam Home, the Summer Winos decided to spend a glorious May afternoon in Holmfirth tracking down some of the episode’s more notable locations.  Thanks to all at Sid’s Cafe and the Shoulder of Mutton pub for allowing us to film there, and to our regular, long-suffering cameraman Andrew Orton! He’s rapidly becoming our ‘Third Man’…

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    June 30, 2015 1:08 pmPosted 2 years ago
    Austin Hendricks

    Loved it. I had rewatched Getting Sam Home just a few weeks ago. Indeed, I started watching all the episodes again! For the I don’t know how many time. I just enjoy them so much. I look forward to your postings, your love for the series is evident. See you in Summer Wine Land, Austin

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    June 30, 2015 2:22 pmPosted 2 years ago
    Bob Fischer

    Thanks Austin, as ever! You’re very kind.

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    June 30, 2015 4:18 pmPosted 2 years ago
    Darren Stephens

    Very nice, lads.

    And one little thing I notice: Clegg in a bowler hat in the funeral pic. You don’t see a bowler much these days, and they’re a lovely thing are bowler hats.

    It also made me think of Patrick Macnee, and his umbrella too, which, if you have seen Kingsman, still echoes down the years to this day. Macnee talked about fighting in the war, and how it made him bury his emotions. Acting was a way to release some of that, it seemed.

    Maybe that “not talking about the war” was just a reflection of what everyone did. Buried it. And sometimes, just very occasionally, something makes it bubble up to the surface before it’s pushed back down again before it opens up a well of pain. Something that seemed to be true of that whole generation, bless ’em. It’s especially poignant when you compare that kind of quiet stoicism to the modern culture of almost conspicuous emoting: once again a symbol of a Britain that is fading away before our eyes.

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      June 30, 2015 5:36 pmPosted 2 years ago
      Bob Fischer

      Yes, true. My Gran lived through the First and Second World War, the first of these as a child in the East End of London, which must have been nightmarish to say the least. I was 16 when she died, and we were very close, but I can’t remember her ever talking about either war at all. Ditto for all of her friends, and relatives of a similar age.

      Write a book about ‘Changing Britain’, Darren. I’ll buy it.

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      June 30, 2015 8:07 pmPosted 2 years ago
      Andrew T. Smith (Author)

      Bit of a tangeant, but this reminds me of a story I recently heard about Christopher Lee. He was another who didn’t go into great detail about his wartime experiences, partly because he worked in espionage. On one film set, a co-star recalled him jumping to his feet after seeing an actor being skewered by a bayonet. Lee strode straight over to the actor and said, “No. No. A man makes who has been stabbed in the chest does not scream. What one would hear is the escape of air.”

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        June 30, 2015 10:20 pmPosted 2 years ago
        Bob Fischer

        Superb!

        I once interviewed Paul Daniels, who also told me how to kill a man with a bayonet. Does that count?

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        July 1, 2015 10:24 amPosted 2 years ago
        Darren Stephens

        I have heard a slightly different version of that story, which suggests there’s a grain of truth somewhere.

        In the version I heard, on the LotR set, Peter Jackson is directing some fight scene, and stops to tell Lee that he wants him to imagine how to stab someone in the chest, to which Lee rather icily replies, “I don’t have to imagine, Peter”

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          July 1, 2015 3:24 pmPosted 2 years ago
          Bob Fischer

          There’s an argument to be made that the age of the genuine movie ‘tough guy’ ended when the actors who’d seen service in World War 2 were no longer regulars in the film world.

          Matt Damon and Tom Cruise can do all the action movies they like, but they’ll never have the genuine steel of the Lee Marvins and Charles Bronsons. Blokes who’d seen (and been on the end of) some truly terrible things, and… you could see it. There was just something about them.

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    July 8, 2016 9:11 amPosted 1 year ago
    Keith Davies

    Excellent guys, i had the pleasure of visiting Holmfirth last year and it brings back so many memories from the series

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      July 8, 2016 8:28 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Bob Fischer

      Thanks Keith! And welcome to Summer Winos! 🙂

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