Summer Winos»Uncategorized»Series 9 Episode 7: Set The People Free

Series 9 Episode 7: Set The People Free


In which our trio attempt not one, but two great escapes…

Andrew: We’ve talked a little about how Holmfirth is gradually becoming less of a grim place than it was in the show’s early episodes, but the panoramic opening shot that kicks off this episode still offers us a town that is black with soot and capped with a misty haze. Don’t get me wrong, though – I think it looks gorgeous like this. There’s something about those soot-blackened walls that lends Howard’s constant window-washing an air of melancholy. They could be absolutely gleaming, but that house is never going to look ‘clean’. He and Pearl are fighting for house proudness, in a era where that meant something. Also, I don’t want to know what Pearl’s ‘terrible plans’ with an emulsion brush are…

Bob: Is ‘house-proudness’ an actual word? I’ve been staring at it for ten minutes now, and I can’t decide. The only alternative is ‘house-pride’ though, and that just makes me think of Homepride flour. Sorry, am I getting distracted here? You’re right though, Holmfith looks fabulously melancholy and autumnal. I always get a little frisson when the opening shot of an episode is something other than the main trio pottering the countryside; it feels like all bets are off! And I’ve got a bonus frisson from knowing that we’ve actually been on Clegg and Howard’s balcony ourselves! Oh, and whatever Pearl is planning to emulsion, I hope she’s primed it first.

Andrew: You’d better get used to Howard asking for help in getting out of the house – we’ve got over twenty years of it to come!

Bob: It won’t take us twenty years to watch it all, though. No way! At our current rate of progress, it’ll be more like thirty. There’s a tremendous bit of textbook Roy Clarke here, too:

Clegg: What are you using on your windows, Howard?
Howard: The best years of my life…

I also like Howard’s claim that he’s practising his ‘double handed death grip’ on Clegg. ‘Death grips’ were everywhere when I was a kid! I spent most of my 1980s lunchtimes try to perfect (or avoid) them in the school playground. They normally involved a nasty pinch on the side of the neck, and were often accompanied by some kind of mystical Eastern mumbo-jumbo, shouted at a volume not quite loud enough to attract the attention of Mrs Gallon, our most feared, yellow-overalled dinnernanny. I blame The Karate Kid. Or possibly Mr Spock.

Andrew: I think we’ve mentioned this before, but Jonathan Linsley is a very good background actor. Just look at the concentration on Crusher’s face as he carefully dries one fork with a dishcloth.

Bob: He’s terrific! It’s the sequel to his open-mouthed window-wiping in the previous episode. And good grief, our heroes are eating BEANS-ON-TOAST in the cafe! When did that ever happen before? Ivy is normally lucky to flog them three cups of tea, so an actual hot meal is the Summer Wine equivalent of dining at the Savoy! Are we seeing Seymour’s influence here? Although he always strikes me as the kind of penniless toff who would happily tuck into a table laden with slap-up posh nosh before tapping his pockets in mock surprise and saying ‘I’m terribly sorry, old boy… I seem to have left my wallet at the Garrick…’

I can’t help but notice that the cafe has a list of Huddersfield Town fixtures on the wall, too. If we’re assuming they’re for the 1986/87 season, then it wasn’t a vintage campaign for the Terriers. They spent the entire season at the bottom of the old Division 2, and their manager Mick Buxton was sacked about six weeks before this episode was broadcast. They only escaped relegation by three points, and ultimately went down the following season. I know some people have no interest in such sporting frivoloties, and prefer to concentrate on the important implications of Pearl’s ambitions with an emulsion brush, but this nonsense genuinely gives these episodes a social and historical context for me! Although, on the downside, I’ve had to think about Duncan Shearer.

Andrew: There’s an odd directorial quirk that crops up when Crusher foolishly asks Seymour about ‘man’s superior intellect’. Last of the Summer Wine, at this stage, is still predominantly a studio-based sitcom, shot in front of a live audience. Traditionally, this means that each scene is shot in quite a theatrical style. There are three walls to each set, with the fourth wall removed to allow both the cameras and the live audience to see what’s going on. When Seymour turns to Crusher, however, that fourth wall is either back in, or they have cheated in such a way as to make it look like it is. Either way, Seymour’s closeup has to have been filmed separately and edited in later, or else we would have seen a hulking great BBC video camera in the middle of the previous shot. This wouldn’t be at all unusual for a film-based series, but for an old-school sitcom it is rather jarring – to me at least. Once again, I think Bell is showing his true colours.

Bob: As a film director, you mean? This is why I need you here… I honestly wouldn’t have noticed that in a million years. Although thankyou for distracting me from thoughts of Duncan Shearer.

Andrew: ‘Apathy Birthday To You’ might be my favourite Compo moment in a long while. It’s so silly and fun and underlines that fact that Bill Owen has now brought the character into full-on pixie mode. Compo at the start of the series might be someone you’d cross the street to avoid, but he’s such a delight not you’d run to him.

Bob: That made me laugh out loud, too! I know Roy Clarke told us (CLANG!) that he saw the main trio as elderly children from the very start of the series, but Compo has certainly become more childish as the years have rolled by. I guess, in the early years, he was a like lazy, sulky teenager with an air of danger… whereas now he’s an absolutely loveable eight-year-old.

Andrew: ‘Love is always a clean shirt’ is such a beautiful, yet thoroughly depressing phrase, isn’t it?

Bob: I made a note of that, too. There’s a real sadness to it, and to Peter Sallis’ immaculate delivery. He’s half-missing his late wife, but also half-mourning the fact that his marriage seems to have been barely more than a state of convenient domesticity for them both. It’s been fifteen years since she died, and Clegg is still only in his mid-fifties, but he’s never shown the slightest interest in finding another relationship.

Seymour, however, is positively pining. ‘If only I’d met Marjorie earlier…’ he muses. Is this the first time she’s been mentioned? Compo and Clegg don’t seem to be aware of her existence. In my fevered imagination, Marjorie is genuinely Seymour’s soulmate… a woman that he met and fell in love with only after she got married to some less-deserving pillock. But Seymour was married as well, wasn’t he? He’s moping about his ex-wife when we first meet him, in Uncle of the Bride. Having lost out on Marjorie, did he reluctantly marry another woman who, despite her best efforts, didn’t make his heart quicken in quite the same way? No wonder his wife left him. There’s such sadness in all of these backstories.

Andrew: Shop front update! The business at the end of Nora and Compo’s road is still G.W. Castle Ltd. As you were.

Bob: If you’re not careful, you’ll gain us a reputation as some kind of pathetic obsessives. And aw… just as Howard is imprisoned by Pearl, Wally is kept in captive domesticity by Nora. And she’s getting ready to wield her emulsion brush, too! What’s going on here? Have G.W. Castle Ltd been flogging off a job lot of cheap paint? Joe Gladwin is a deadpan delight, as ever. ‘It’s just one giddy sensation after another…’

And so Compo, Clegg and Seymour make it their mission to spring Howard and Wally from their domestic bondage. And I bet that’s something you can’t buy from G.W. Castle Ltd.

Andrew: The old pram wheel that our trio find in the river has endless possibilities. How did it get there? I bet Clarke could get an entire episode out of that back story.

Bob: Never mind that, what about Clegg’s description – ‘maybe it’s a primitive form of contraception’?! That’s the kind of ribald musing that we haven’t heard in Summer Wine for a little while! Very topical, though… 1987 was arguably the height of the media’s coverage of the dangers of AIDS, and it was suddenly perfectly commonplace to hear talk of ‘condoms’ in all kinds of unexpected places. I’d go as far to say that ‘Safe Sex’ was arguably the phrase of 1987, even amongst Huddersfield Town fans.

Andrew: Oh, no! There’s another one of those horrible video-mixer clock-wipe thingies – this time accompanied by a musical cue just to draw further attention to it. I hope this isn’t a lasting trend; this is Summer Wine not Star Wars!

Bob: Ha! Ha! I thought of Star Wars as well! In case nobody has a bleedin’ clue what we’re talking about, the changeover from one scene to another is achieved with the picture changing in a sweeping motion like the hands of a clock whistling around… George Lucas was absolutely obsessed with using them in his early films, but it does seem oddly incongrous here. Mind you, some of Harrison Ford’s recent aeroplane prangs have a hint of Last of the Summer Wine about them. Was that plane he crashed into a golf course designed to look like a giant ferret?

Andrew: Argh, I’ve jinxed it! Another one of those accursed clock wipes! I’d be fascinated to see if these are in the scripts or a result of having to trim material for time.

Bob: They were put there thirty years ago specifically to annoy YOU. Alan Bell plays a LONG GAME.

In a lovely bit of continuity, Seymour still has the ‘Codfanglers’ voice identification gizmo on his front door, but blimey… he’s now changed the password to ‘Marjorie’! He’s really got it bad! Again, in my fevered imagination, he’s done that in the hope that Marjorie will one day turn up at the house with a hastily-packed bag… and be able to guess that the password has been set in her honour. I absolutely love these little, unexplained titbits of backstory that we’re given, a tiny hint at a time.

Andrew: The cast are really playing to the audience this week, but I mean that in the best possible sense – particularly in this scene. Peter Sallis is the one who really stands out. He’s usually very restrained and subtle, but just look at the synchronized bits of physical business he’s got going on with Bill Owen here. There must have been something in the water.

Bob: Just pram wheels and contraceptives. But yes – they’re on fire this week! I’m thoroughly enjoying this… all of the regulars are playing it with gusto, and there’s some cracking dialogue, too. Sallis has got the lions’ share of it this week… I loved Clegg’s memories of living ‘in a hothouse of tension and damp carpets… it was like Tennessee Williams.’

Andrew: Another of the ways in which Seymour differs from Foggy is the lack of engagement on his part. He’s just as likely to ignore Compo and power ahead with a train of thought than to directly engage with him. Is it niceness or apathy (birthday)? Whatever the answer, he still gets his way.

Bob: In my capacity as this blog’s official CLASS WARRIOR, I’ll speculate that it’s a terrible sense of upper-middle-class entitlement. Seymour is a professional man, with breeding, don’t you know! He doesn’t need the permission of working class commoners like Compo before he forges ahead with his crackpot schemes. Although, funnily enough, I’ve also written ‘Is Seymour too nice?’ in my notes. Despite his railroading of the ‘lower orders’, he doesn’t have the brusqueness and impatience of Blamire and Foggy. I bet he’d actually be lovely, genial company over a few drinks.

Andrew: The trio head back to Clegg’s house and mull over Howard’s fate. There’s a lot of filmed material in this episode, isn’t there? And ambitiously filmed material too – not just workmanlike long-shot, mid-shot, close-up work, but thoughtfully constructed sequences. I can’t quite get my mind around the sheer number of setups that Bell appears to have been able to get through in what must have been a matter of hours for each location. The crew must have been really well drilled.

Bob: Again, you’re a born film director. My main observation at this stage was that Compo steals a bottle of milk from Clegg’s doorstep on the way into the house, suggesting that Clegg has the tardiest milkman in the West Riding! They’ve been out all day, so this must be late in the afternoon! Oooh, I bet it was on the turn…

Andrew: Pearl assaults Seymour with an emulsion brush – making this deadly implement a running theme of the episode. I wonder what horrible thing happened to Roy Clarke to give him this post-traumatic flash of inspiration? And Clegg uses a vignette between a husband and his ‘bossy’ wife in the pub as an example of the evolution of the Yorkshire housewife, but I can’t be the only one who feels her request that he not drink and drive isn’t completely unreasonable!

Bob: Oh, I love that scene. ‘He’ll have a small beer…’ she snaps, and there’s no arguing. It’s a little mini-rumination on the miseries of loveless marriage, and – yet again – Clegg has the killer lines. ‘Years of exposure to treacle pudding forges formidable wives…’ he muses, with a wince. Good grief, you can virtually taste the comfortable drudgery of Clegg’s married life from these tiny revelations. Treacle puddings, damp carpets, pent-up tension… and clean shirts. The combination of repressed, domestic duty with the reassurance of steady – but dreary – home life. Oh god, it’s brilliant. I bet they never went out.

Andrew: We’re treated to even more classy location work, as the trio travel to Pearl and Howard’s house in Wesley’s van. They’ve even gone to the trouble of mounting cameras down the sides of the vehicle to lend the stunt work a real bit of dynamism. This is definitely the most ambitiously directed-episode to date. And is the track playing on Wesley’s car radio the same one we’ve heard in previous episodes? I think it is. He must be a real admirer of BBC Stock Rock Music #446/H37.

Bob: That’s my favourite heavy rock song of all time. But yes! I think the same track was used every time a BBC sitcom featured a ‘punk rocker’. I haven’t checked, but I’d put money on the same track being used in the episode of Terry and June where June decides to ‘get with it’ and slouches into the front room in leathers, safety pins and spiked, peroxide hair. And no… I’m not making this up.

Andrew: I promise that I’ll stop banging on about the direction after this, but in the sequence where our trio attempt to jailbreak Wally from the clutches of Nora, I counted 32 distinct shot set-ups, some of which involve camera cranes, stuntmen, and handheld shots in a rubber dinghy. Between each of these setups the crew needs time to reset, check the gate, occasionally change the magazine, make sure the sound is fine, and ensure that Joe Gladwin hasn’t drowned. This is a BBC sitcom, for God’s sake – not The Great Escape! Then again, maybe that’s the allusion that got Alan Bell fired up this week. The only thing that slightly spoiled the sequence for me was the fact that Stuart Fell (I assume), doubling for Compo as he leads Nora away, stood out so much that I assumed the use of a doppelganger was part of the plot, and was left scratching my head a bit when it wasn’t followed up on!

Bob: Again, I didn’t notice! Honestly, I was absolutely swept up in the closing sequences of this episode… in attempting to spring Howard from the miseries of domestic slavery, our heroes are beaten back by Pearl (who lets loose with a ‘What the blood and stomach pills…?’ line stolen directly from Ivy! Does that phrase occur anywhere else but in the scripts to Last of the Summer Wine?); but they distract Nora Batty for long enough to coax Wally down their ladder and into the waiting dinghy that you mention. I remember watching this scene back in 1987, and feeling a wave of genuine love for Joe Gladwin even then, because he’s clearly rather frail in these location scenes… the bloke had turned eighty, and you can see it in his movements, being gently helped into the boat. Even as a teenager, I just wanted to give him a huge (but careful) hug.

And, 31 years later, all of those feelings have returned… and then some. We’re reaching the end of Joe’s fourteen years in Summer Wine, and I’m so saddened by that. He’s been such a highlight of the show, and when you see him acting on the small screen, you see 70 years of experience in Music Hall and variety theatre seeping out of every performance. And you also see a wonderful little man, who – over 100 years after he was born – is still thrilling the socks off two grotty little herberts like us. The final scene of this episode, with Joe laughing his head off in that rotating rubber dinghy, is just joyous. Glorious. I really want to do more to help celebrate his life and work. And I still want to give him a huge (but careful) hug.

Andrew: What a great episode. The ambition of a feature film within thirty minutes of sitcom, all underpinned by a fantastically tight script and some truly joyous performances. One of the best.

Bob: Nail on head. That was wonderful.

27 comments

  • Visit site
    September 14, 2018 8:10 amPosted 3 months ago
    Stephen Hatfield

    Re paragraph two , i think the phrase your’e looking for is ‘House proud’ , your’e welcome. Great piece by the way , splendid work chaps!

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      September 14, 2018 9:23 amPosted 3 months ago
      Bob Fischer

      Thankyou! Although ‘house proud’ is the adjective expression. We need a noun.

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        September 14, 2018 10:20 amPosted 3 months ago
        Stephen Hatfield

        Drawing a blank on that one , much like my grammar in my original post ! Your’e instead of you’re ….going to hang my head in shame for the rest of the day! I’m still laughing at the Duncan Shearer and the Terry and June ‘punk’ comments , very funny!

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          September 14, 2018 5:20 pmPosted 3 months ago
          Bob Fischer

          The great thing about the Terry and June ‘punk’ episode is that it’s from the final series, from 1987! So only a good, solid decade after the height of punk.

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            September 14, 2018 8:36 pmPosted 3 months ago
            Stephen Hatfield

            Absolutely,very much in the same way Ronnie Barker would portray a punk from around the same time ,a overblown caricature. All us teenage kids thought genuine punks were something from a bygone irrelevant era ,might as well have been teddy boys, by this time. To see a depiction like that would have made me cringe, missing the mark by a considerable distance.

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              September 15, 2018 12:07 pmPosted 3 months ago
              Bob Fischer

              I guess the stereotype. postcard punk (leathers, safety pins, mohican) just became sitcom shorthand for ‘grotty young person’, and that stuck around for a few years. In a way, I can understand that… comedy often works in shortcuts, and if you need a broad, mainstream (and older) TV audience to instantly think ‘Ah… this is a rebellious young person’, then the trademark punk look does that straight away.

              But yeah, for us kids, that punk look was very outdated by then! Although, oddly enough… I always thought Kenny Everett’s Gizzard Puke worked brilliantly.

              Reply
              • September 15, 2018 2:49 pmPosted 3 months ago
                ds

                Another point. This is 1987. We’re only a handful of years from the Young Ones. And Vyvyan. Most scriptwriters at the time were mostly white, male and middle-aged, so not only have we moved on from the stereotype of the 70s comedy punk, we also have the new wave to factor in. And Edmonson clearly kept that trope alive in TVC. Also, the writers are mostly London-centric, so the image is of the McLaren/Westwood punk, though a few years before, was probably at least a bit more visible in the capital than it was to us yokels out in the frozen, barren wasteland of the provinces

                I think the reason Gizzard works is *because* it’s Ken. The Mohican is so obviously fake, and then there’s the beard.

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                  September 15, 2018 5:19 pmPosted 3 months ago
                  Bob Fischer

                  I once wondered if Crusher was Roy Clarke’s little nod to the punk-ish sensibilites of the Young Ones, but I think I was alone in that.

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                    September 15, 2018 6:20 pmPosted 3 months ago
                    ds

                    You should have asked him

                    Reply
                    • Visit site
                      September 15, 2018 8:36 pmPosted 3 months ago
                      Bob Fischer

                      I might have done. I can’t remember the last hour of that conversation.

              • Visit site
                September 16, 2018 11:13 amPosted 2 months ago
                Stephen

                For every Vyvyan and Gizzard there’s a Terry and June , Metal Mickey or Sorry, I’m a Stranger Here Myself depiction! Both as far removed from the original punk ,(was there ever such a thing anyway or was it a media construction/stereotype, I think the latter) , as you could wish for!

                Reply
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    September 14, 2018 9:50 amPosted 3 months ago
    Clive Harris

    Do you think the earlier episodes WERE recorded in front of a live audience. We attended recordings of later episodes, and we were shown the film, so they could record our reactions, but there was no live recording. The cast came on too, and we saw some behind-the-scenes clips. I wonder if it was different with earlier episodes ?

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      September 14, 2018 9:54 amPosted 3 months ago
      Andrew T. Smith (Author)

      The first two decades of the show (pretty much) were taped at BBC TV centre in front of a live studio audience with the pre-recorded film inserts played back for them at the appropriate points. I can’t remember exactly when the switch to it being an entirely pre-recorded film-based show was, but it was sometime during the second Foggy era.

      Reply
      • September 14, 2018 4:41 pmPosted 3 months ago
        Nick Griffiths

        I have a distinct feeling it was around 1992 as there was a behind the scenes feature on BBC One and one of the Crew revealed the entire show was now recorded on location.

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  • Visit site
    September 14, 2018 10:13 amPosted 3 months ago
    Dene

    The last studio audience series was series 13, 1991. From S14 onwards the series was all film (later digital) 🙂

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      September 14, 2018 4:05 pmPosted 3 months ago
      Andrew T. Smith (Author)

      Cheers, Dene. I’m glad somebody is on the ball!

      Reply
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      September 14, 2018 5:16 pmPosted 3 months ago
      Bob Fischer

      It’ll be interesting to see if the all-film approach gives it a different feel. I’d drifted away from the series by 1991 (blame university, and teenage stuff in general) so it’ll all be new to me!

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        September 14, 2018 8:20 pmPosted 3 months ago
        Andrew T. Smith (Author)

        The era I am cautious of is the OB video season. We’ll keep expecting Sylvester McCoy to show up.

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          September 15, 2018 8:24 pmPosted 3 months ago
          Bob Fischer

          You say that like it’s a bad thing…

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      September 18, 2018 8:29 pmPosted 2 months ago
      Clive Harris

      Thank you everyone. That’s very interesting to hear. It would have been great to have attended a studio recording and to have seen the actors at work …

      Reply
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    September 14, 2018 4:18 pmPosted 3 months ago
    David Dunham

    Andrew, Stuart Fell will forever be loved in Doctor Who circles, and especially by Katy Manning, for doing his Jo Grant-with-a-wiggly-bum impression while climbing the sea fort in “The Sea Devils.”

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      September 14, 2018 5:15 pmPosted 3 months ago
      Bob Fischer

      Absolutely, cheers David! We’re Doctor Who fans as well (for our sins) and love Stuart. If you haven’t seen it, check out the ‘Interviews’ section of the site – we had a lovely chat with him a few years ago.

      Reply
  • Visit site
    September 15, 2018 2:17 pmPosted 3 months ago
    ds

    I think Symour’s attitude to Compo sometimes is more than middle-class entitlement. If you take the man out of teaching…

    I think he’s bascially treating Compo like some recalcitrant, snotty little Herbert who would have tried to waste his time in the classroom over the years. The best way is just to plough on and pretend it didn’t happen, usually by upping the volume. A kind of professional equivalent of hands over the ears and “la la la”

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      September 15, 2018 3:56 pmPosted 3 months ago
      Bob Fischer

      Ah, that’s a good point. Where does Clegg fit into all this, then? Is he the essentially decent lad who does all his work, but still sucks up to the naughty kids?

      Reply
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    September 15, 2018 6:23 pmPosted 3 months ago
    ds

    I think Clegg might be the careworn one in the staffroom who’s counting the days to retirement, and just wishes the little bleeders would shut up and let him have a quiet life until he gets his carriage click and a handshake.

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      September 19, 2018 8:58 amPosted 2 months ago
      Bob Fischer

      I’m thinking Dudley Sutton in the Beiderbecke Affair…

      Reply
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    October 12, 2018 4:25 pmPosted 2 months ago
    peter gazzard

    One of my favourite bits of dialogue
    Seymour:I wish I’d met Marjorie earlier
    Compo:Marjorie who?
    Clegg:Earlier,Marjorie Earlier

    Reply

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