Summer Winos»Uncategorized»Series 3 Episode 5: The Kink in Foggy's Niblick

Series 3 Episode 5: The Kink in Foggy's Niblick


In which Foggy becomes a seasoned swinger…


Bob:  Given that it’s a series centered around working class Yorkshiremen, it’s surprising how tiny a part football plays in Summer Wine… I can’t remember any characters expressing much interest in the sport at all. I’m assuming that it’s a reflection of Roy Clarke’s lack of footballing enthusiasm, so it feels slightly incongruous in this episode to see Foggy, Compo and Clegg bundling their jackets into goalposts and attempting a kickabout… even if it’s a matter of moments before Foggy sprains his back and professes that, actually, he’s more of a golfing man instead.

I remember roaring with laughter at this episode as a kid, but – oddly – watching it now, I think it’s probably the weakest we’ve seen so far. Still enjoyable, but it feels like a bit of an anti-climax following the superb Scarborough two-parter.

A rare glimpse inside Foggy's attic!

A rare glimpse inside Foggy’s attic!

Andrew: Yeah, it’s OK, but there’s something just a little bit forced about it. Sallis and Owen in particular seem to be playing it much broader than usual. Perhaps they noticed that the dialogue wasn’t quite up to the usual standard and felt the need to compensate.

Bob: Still some interesting bits, though… is this one of very few occasions on which we see inside Foggy’s house? Albeit only his attic, where Clegg gives us a lovely, surreal monologue about ‘the den of the great wardrobe spider’… take note, Steven Moffat.

I did wonder about Foggy’s domestic situation here… it’s mentioned in his first episode that he’s returning to ‘an empty house in Arnold Crescent’, which I assumed he’d inherited. But now he appears to have an unseen landlady living on the premises! I know I shouldn’t get too wrapped up Summer Wine continuity, but this is the stuff that keeps me awake at nights…

Once Foggy’s decidedly wonky golf clubs have been retrieved, we head to the posh clubhouse and – ultimately –  the local green itself, where predictable antics ensue. Again, we get a line that seems very un-Summer Wine with the benefit of hindsight… Compo, on spying a troupe of stern-looking lady golfers, says ‘Fancy being up for municipal rape and finding that lot on the jury’. I wonder what Mary Whitehouse thought? 

Relaxing at the 19th hole

Relaxing at the 19th hole

Andrew: The plot itself is also a bit broad, and not particularly tailored to the series. One could just as easily drop Del Boy, Rodney and Boycie or Bob and Terry into this situation without having to change the lines too much. That indefinable Summer Wine-ness isn’t to be found, though it’s hard to pinpoint why.

Bob: When Compo was making a nuisance of himself in the clubhouse, demanding beer and peanuts to Foggy’s embarrassment, I thought of Bob and Terry too! And you’re right… Compo’s rampaging around the golf course, swiping wayward balls to sell back to their owners, is pure Del Boy. 

It does have one great line, though – Foggy’s description of Compo as ‘what you’d get if you tried to summon up a small evil spirit at midnight in an Oxfam shop’ had me chuckling.

Andrew: You do have to give Clarke credit for that title, though – it’s possibly his finest so far! The perfect blend of whimsy and archaic oddball terminology … or a knob joke, take your pick.

Bob: A lovely mixture of all three, I think. It IS a great title, and one I remember causing much hilarity at school when this was repeated back in the early 1980s.

5 comments

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    March 30, 2012 11:18 amPosted 5 years ago
    Jakob Pieterson

    I can’t help wondering if “Kink in Foggy’s Niblick” is an episode written for Blamire, that Roy Clarke has adapted for Foggy…The landlady situation fits Blamire more, and I can picture his character attempting to fit in with the Golf crowd.

    I still rather like the episode though, there’s some lovely moments in it.

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      March 31, 2012 4:14 pmPosted 5 years ago
      Andrew T. Smith

      That’s an interesting point and probably true. Foggy’s landlady mysteriously disappears later in the run.

      Reply
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    October 21, 2015 7:04 pmPosted 2 years ago
    L. Grey

    Perhaps, given this episode is still quite soon after Foggy has returned, he’s staying temporarily as a boarder whilst the house at Arnold Crescent is cleaned/ refurbished? It’d explain his line about ‘returning to the empty house’ as well as the vanishing landlady, at any rate. Given Compo’s line in ‘The Man From Oswestry’, ‘A great long gormless streak from Arnold Crescent’, the clear implication, to me, is that he’s come back to his family’s house, which as you said, he’d inherited.

    Love the site; keep up the good work, gentlemen!

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      October 26, 2015 2:44 pmPosted 1 year ago
      Bob Fischer

      Thankyou… and good points, all!

      Reply
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    September 12, 2016 1:24 pmPosted 1 year ago
    Simon S

    The attic scene is an odd clash with his previously established return to the family homestead. The sense that he is “the Last of the Dewhirsts” makes him rather tragic, really, and having him reduced to a mere lodger seems too much. His steadfast stone-face whilst Compo & Clegg are larking is the archetypal elder indulging children. His inference in the café that “that fool Hitler” personally thwarted his golf career just fits his whole world.

    I can’t see Blamire using those clubs, really, but they suit Foggy so well. From his convincing back sprain (and a nice nod to the MOTD theme when Compo dummies Clegg), to his ludicrous plus fours, it’s a showcase for him, really, with Compo busy discovering the value of enterprise. Of course Foggy plays on to the last, in spite of all logic of pitch darkness.

    And it’s a great title 🙂

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